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Monday, May 4, 2020 | History

2 edition of Cephalus and Procris found in the catalog.

Cephalus and Procris

Cephalus and Procris

A dramatic masque. With a pantomime interlude call"d, Harlequin grand Volgi. As it is perform"d by His Majesty"s company of comedians at the Theatre-Royal in Drury-Lane.

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Published by Printed for J. Watts in London .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Micro-opaque of original in Yale University Library. New York, Readex Microprint, 1956. 1 card. 22.6 x 14.8 cm. (Three centuries of drama: English 1701-1750) (Three centuries of English and American plays 1500-1800).

Other titlesHarlequin grand Volgi.
SeriesThree centuries of drama, Three centuries of English and American plays, 1500-1800
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination[2], 20 p.
Number of Pages20
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16884137M

One of hundreds of thousands of free digital items from The New York Public Library.   This is a animation I made for an school assignment. It's a little story about a loving couple and the feeling of being jealous in a relationship. I don't own any of the music I used.

Death of Procris,Erectheus,dog andHarpy and Cephalus at right Hamilton,William and Pierre d Hancarville Published by Naples,Francesco Morelli (). Procris was the daughter of the king of Athens, Erechtheus, and Queen had two sisters, Creusa and Orithyia. She married Cephalus, son of Deioneus.. According to one source, Cephalus decided to test his wife's love for him, and left his home for eight years. When he returned, he disguised himself and then managed to seduce his wife. The couple reconciled, but Procris was afraid.

la musique du prologue & du melo-drame est composee par Mr. Reichard, directeur de la Chapelle du roi. (Statement Of Responsibility). U.S. RISM Libretto Project. "Prologue"--p. ; divisional title--p. 9; scenario of untitled ballet in 2 scenes involving the same characters as the melodrama--p. Place and date of performance surmised from imprint. Leuker, Tobias, “Cephalus and Procris”, in: Brill’s New Pauly Supplements I - Volume 4: The Reception of Myth and Mythology, English edition by David van Eijndhoven, Christine Salazar, and Francis G. Gentry (). Original German-language edition: Mythenrezeption: Die antike Mythologie in Literatur, Musik und Kunst von den Anfängen bis.


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Cephalus and Procris Download PDF EPUB FB2

Cephalus takes his wife back, but things go south really fast when a gossip tells Procris that Cephalus is cheating on her. (Ah, how the tables have turned.) She hides in a bush to spy on him when he's hunting, and when Cephalus hears rustling, he hurls the non-missing spear.

Characters in Cephalus and Procris. BACK; NEXT ; Meet the Cast. Cephalus. On the one hand, Cephalus is kind of a stand-up guy. When he's stolen away by Eos, the gorgeous goddess of dawn, he stays true to his wife.

In fact, he goes on about Procris so much that Eos gets f. The story of Cephalus and Procris is featured in the book entitled 'The Age of Fable, or Stories of Gods and Heroes' by Thomas Bulfinch.

Thomas Bulfinch's study of Greek and Roman Mythology, was first published in Cephalus answered the call and came with his dog and javelin. The dog chased the fox for a long time and even though the fox used all of its tricks the dog stayed in pursuit.

Just as the climax of the hunt was approaching the gods turned both of the animals into stone because they couldn’t bear to see one of the animals triumph (revocataque. Cephalus was a figure in Greek mythology, son of the ruler of Phocis, Deion, and was married to Procris, daughter of the king of Athens Erectheus and r, he was kidnapped by the goddess of dawn, Eos, and they became lovers.

Cephalus never stopped loving Procris, though, which caused the discontent of Eos and eventually, she returned him to his wife. Summary and Analysis Book I: Section I Summary. The dialogue begins with what is apparently a friendly and innocuous conversation between Socrates and Cephalus, in which Socrates asks Cephalus what he has learned from having lived a long life during which Cephalus has managed to acquire a.

Procris und Cephalus: in einen Singe-Spiel vorgestellet. Contributor Names Bronner, Georg, or(composer) Created / Published Gedruckt bey Nicolaus Spieringk, Hamburg,monographic.

Subject Headings. Metamorphoses Book 7: Cephalus and Procris. The following morning, Cephalus and his men woke before Aeacus, and so the king's youngest son, Phocus, talked with them.

The boy noticed Cephalus' javelin and asked him where he'd gotten it. Although it was a sore subject with Cephalus, he told the boy the story behind the javelin. Suspecting Cephalus of infidelity, she follows him on a hunting trip.

He hears her and, thinking some wild animal is near, hurls his magic spear. In this vivid illustration from Act IV, the dying Procris reels against the force of the javelin. Ovid’s ancient myth ends tragically at this point, leaving Cephalus to wander the earth in lonely guilt. Cephalus, in Greek mythology, son of Hermes and Herse, daughter of Cecrops, king of ing to Hesiod’s Theogony, he was beloved by the goddess Dawn (Eos, or Aurora), who carried him off to live with her on Mount his hound, Laelaps (Hurricane), he overcame the vixen of Teumessus that had ravaged Boeotia.

Ovid (Metamorphoses, Book VII) confused this Cephalus with. Cephalus and Procris, although rather badly spelt. Pyramus says, "Not Shafalus to Procrus was so true." Thisbe. "As Shafalus to Procrus, I to you." Moore, in his Legendary Ballads, has one on Cephalus and Procris, beginning thus: "A hunter once in a grove reclined, To shun the noon's bright eye, And oft he wooed the wandering wind.

Aurora, goddess of dawn, fell in love with the mortal Cephalus and tried to seduce him. He thought only of his wife Procris and rejected her.

Poussin shows the cause of Cephalus' rejection of Aurora through the putto holding up Procris' portrait, a detail not included in the best-known version of the story in Book 7 of Ovid's 'Metamorphoses'.

Cephalus (; Ancient Greek: Κέφαλος, Kephalos) is a name, used both for the hero-figure in Greek mythology and carried as a theophoric name by historical persons. The word kephalos is Greek for "head", perhaps used here because Cephalus was the founding "head" of a great family that includes could be that Cephalus means the head of the Sun who kills (evaporates) Procris (dew.

Excerpt from Cephalus and Procris: Narcissus II. The fate Of the Author and his work is remarkable. Although he mentions several of his contemporaries with the most kind and just appreciation of their merits, it does not appear that any one of them thought his name worthy Of record and his work, with one or two exceptions, may be said to have been left unre garded from the time of its : Thomas Edwards.

However, when Procris, out of jealousy, spied on her husband during one of his hunts, he mistook her for an animal and accidentally killed her. Cephalus was banned for this. Later he helped Amphitryon in a war, and for his assistance he was awarded with the island of Cephallenia.

Urbino maiolica dish showing Cephalus and Procris,Francesco Xanto Avelli (c. ONLY THE BEST Discussed are the story of Cephalus and Procris, the connections between Cephalus and syphilis, and the tale's transmission during the early modern period. Suffix indicating an organism having a particular kind of head, e.g., Rhipicephalus (fan-shaped head).

Bk VII The infidelities of Cephalus and Procris They filled a long day with this and other talk: the last of the light was given over to feasting, and night to sleep.

The sun shone gold again, but an east wind was still blowing, and kept the sails from the homeward voyage.

Cephalus (/ ˈ s ɛ f əl ə s /; Ancient Greek: Κέφαλος Kephalos means "head" [citation needed]) is a name, used both for the hero-figure in Greek mythology and carried as a theophoric name by historical persons.

Mythological. Cephalus, an Athenian son of Hermes and Herse.; Cephalus, husband of Procris.; Historical. Cephalus, son of Lysanias from Syracuse (5th century BCE), a wealthy. The tale of Cephalus and Procris ends the seventh book of Ovid's Metamorphoses.

It is rich in strange and magical elements, speaking of love, mistrust, coincidence, necessity, inescapable devices and fatal paradoxes.

This person told Procris, who decided to spy on Cephalus during one of his hunting trips. Cephalus mistook her for an animal and slew her with his golden-tipped spear. Analysis. Book VII contains the first soliloquy, and the first subtle psychological struggle, in the Metamorphoses.Full text of "Cephalus and Procris.

Narcissus" See other formats.MLA Format. The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Print Collection, The New York Public Library. "Cephalus et Procris Mors" The New York Public Library Digital Collections